Tag Archives: binding

Round Patio Tablecloth with tassel trim

round tablecloth

Round is not such a difficult option for a patio table. Really it’s just a matter of trimming your fabric and sewing in a hem … of course, it will be a long hem, but worth the trouble!

unfinished tablecloth

Before: A square tablecloth is ok for a round patio table, but I wanted a neater look.

Cut a quick circle: Fold twice and draw a curved edge

Fold a big square of fabric in quarters and mark an arc along raw edges from centre point out. You can cut thru all layers at once if the textile is not too thick.

add tassel trim

Open up the circle, and hem up with tassel trim. It took 4 yards of trim to get around this 62″ wide tablecloth. I ironed a hem up and pinned the trim all around in place. The first pass of stitching caught the upper edge of trim and the raw edge of fabric. The second pass caught the low (tassel) edge of trim and the fold edge of fabric.

Widen a Narrow Bolt of Fabric with a side panel

In order to get a decent hang-down off my 48″ patio table, I needed to add an 8″ panel to the side of my 54″ blue checked fabric.

I added the panel using a flat fell seam, so both sides looked finished. (The panel is small checks.)

I added the panel using a flat fell seam, so both sides looked finished. (The panel is small checks.)

Amount fabric required:  

Tablecloth fabric:  2 yds

Tassel Trim: (for 48″ table) – 4 yds

How about a hole for the umbrella?

That will require some sort of a slit and an overlap. Next project.

Next tablecloth will need a centre opening for my patio umbrella

Next tablecloth will need a centre opening for my patio umbrella

Finished Spotted Tote Bag from canvas remnant

Putting together this big dotted tote – ideal for grocery store or library hauls – was not without incident. Looking back now, I realize I was pushing my trusty home machine to its limits, expecting it to speed through six layers of canvas, loaded with upholstery thread, (and a sloppy bobbin wind to boot). After an angry flip-out, following the fourth thread snarl-up, I cooled down and did manage the assembly. Continue reading

Batik Summer Dress with Self-Binding

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I can hardly wait for summer to wear this plum and red batik dress. Since the fabric was light-weight cotton, I choose to make bias binding for the armholes rather than purchase some close, but not-quite-perfect shade. Self-binding is easy: simply cut two-inch wide strips as long as you can on a 45 degree angle so they can be pressed into the curves. I liked the batik pattern of this summer dress to stand on its own.

Now, hemming a flare or bell skirt can be challenging, but don’t despair. You can fit the wide cut edge into a tight taper no sweat. You’ll have to manufacture some evenly-spaced folds along the way of course. Remember your assistant the iron is standing by, press small folds evenly along the length to make the fit. Baste before the final machine sewing. It’s worth the effort as this is one of the most flattering hem styles, especially in motion.