New Corduroy Cover for Curved Rocking Chair

Ahhhh! The curved rocker cover in corduroy is finished and looking very inviting. Re-covering the steel frame chair was indeed a lengthy project from start to finish. A virtual marathon of stitching (43 feet in total) was required, and a couple of serious sessions spent fine-tuning a perfectly snug fit. But all worthwhile in my opinion.

Vintage everything is still a hot trend. And, as this was a gift from my Mum back in the days of lava lamps, I always recall her quirky enthusiasm for chairs.

A mushroom tone corduroy brings a  contemporary  look to this vintage 70's rocker. It replaces a well-worn orange fabric from an earlier era.

A mushroom tone corduroy brings a contemporary look to this vintage 70’s rocker. It replaces a well-worn orange fabric from an earlier era.

Having traced the original ripped and worn upholstery cover and then making a muslin prototype (muslin pattern post), I was ready to cut the actual pattern pieces.  I even drew a pattern layout for 44″ wide textile should I choose to make another (very likely).

Here is my curved rocker slipcover pattern in reduced scale. Keep in mind, you can make a fine slipcover starting with loose oversize rectangle shapes pinned directly to the bare chair and seam allowances trimmed in place.  (Link if you can). But I found a pattern is helpful for a novice like me.

Here is my curved rocker slipcover pattern in reduced scale. Keep in mind, you can make a fine slipcover starting with loose oversize rectangle shapes pinned directly to the bare chair and seam allowances trimmed in place. See how it’s done. But I found a pattern is helpful for a novice like me.

When installed, the zipper is about a half inch across. The void at the base in the original design was filled with a little black fabric patch to hide the loose zipper tail. Neat.

When installed, the zipper is about a half inch across. The void at the base in the original design was filled with a little black fabric patch to hide the loose zipper tail. Neat.

The entire left side and the entire right side could have been cut as complete flat shapes. instead, the long shapes are divided into smaller segments. Of course, this allows full use of fabric scraps, but also permits play with nap direction. A fabric like corduroy especially lends itself to chevron shapes where the welts are sew together.

The entire left side and the entire right side could have been cut as complete flat shapes. instead, the long shapes are divided into smaller segments. Of course, this allows full use of fabric scraps, but also permits play with nap direction. A fabric like corduroy especially lends itself to chevron shapes where the welts are sew together.

As some commenters have noted earlier, another excellent choice for fabric would be a stretch velour. That would ensure a superb fit, and no wrinkles when you get up after a solid Sunday afternoon read. (Yes, I still lug books from the library, pile them beside me and balance my coffee and biscuits on them. Hello, stern librarian.)

Amount of fabric required on a 44″ wide bolt:   3.3 to 3.5 yards

Order of assembly:

  1. Number One. Sew in the zipper, which will join the left back and the right back.
  2. Good.
  3. Now assemble the sides by sewing the short seams between sections.
  4. Sew sides together at top.
  5. Join sides with back. Sew all around
  6. Baste top to the rest of the cover. Adjust if necessary.
  7. Sew completely around and trim the seams at corners and edge finish.

Put the slipcover on this way: Slip the foot area on; slip the head on a bit. Turn the chair on its side and slip one hip in. Now the other. ZZZzzzzzip (very long zipper)! Sit.

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