Hem the spring coat plus lining

Before advancing to the final stage of hemming the coat, you need to put on the buttons. I chose to make vertical buttonholes for this spring coat; I figured it would look neater as they are big buttons.

A word of caution regarding the fabric:  Sadly, I liked the reverse satin side of this mock suede polyester so much that I used it as the "right" side for the collar. Since then, I have learned that it fuzzes up very easily, even with careful handling. Any roughness on your fingers will snag and pill up the sheen.

A word of caution regarding the fabric: Sadly, I liked the reverse satin side of this mock suede polyester so much that I used it as the “right” side for the collar. Since then, I have learned that it fuzzes up very easily, even with careful handling. Any roughness on your fingers will snag and pill up the sheen.

To determine the ideal placement for four buttons, wear the jacket. Place a pin first at the bust, and then the waist. Remove the jacket and lay it on the work table. Add the third button in between the first two, and then place the fourth the same distance away at the bottom of the row.

Hemming the coat and lining – Simplicity 4014

When hemming, I like to start off with an evenly trimmed bottom edge. Remember, we had to sew five panels together to make the jacket and it’s likely that they will stagger a bit once assembled. And if you are shorter than average, the coat may need a good clip.

So hang the buttoned coat, preferably on your twin sister or dress form but a hanger will do. Pin up the left and right fronts where you like, making sure they are even. Then measure up from the floor to where you pinned, and  keep that measurement consistent as you chalk mark all around the coat at each seam. I have tried to cut garments while they hang, but have had nothing but off-course disasters. So I forego the speedy snip, and only chalk or pin where I intend to cut on a flat surface.

Now put the coat on a table and pin up folding at your chalk marks. Try it on again. If you are bigger in the front or the back it may need a bit of adjustment.  But once you have it where you like,  gently press, and then sew.

I choose to hand stitch this hem so there would not be an obvious stitch line. On some coats you may like to see the stitch line, as in a trench coat.  Once the outer hem is up, hang it again, and chalk mark the lining (which will be visibly hanging lower) about an inch down from the now finished hem of the coat. Place flat to cut at the chalk mark. Turn up, making the folded edge a good 3/4 inch up from the bottom of the coat. There will be no chance of the lining drooping out.

Don't expect a crisp crease when ironing this mock suede polyester. Use a damp cloth, and press only on the wrong side of the fabric. Don't linger with the iron. You risk flattening the crinkle texture pattern if there is too much direct heat.

Don’t expect a crisp crease when ironing this mock suede polyester. Use a damp cloth, and press only on the wrong side of the fabric. Don’t linger with the iron. You risk flattening the crinkle texture pattern if there is too much direct heat.

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